News > Clever Meets Creepy at The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art

EXHIBITION REVIEW — BÖHLER & ORENDT

by Sarah Miller

An animated apparition in mist greets you as you enter each of the seven tents

Walking off Calhoun Street you could find yourself thinking you’ve stumbled upon a nomadic camp, inhabited by ghosts of species past.

Your body takes a moment to adjust to the darkness, noise, and vulnerability when you enter the latest exhibition at the Halsey Institute, The Carrion Cheer, A Faunistic Tragedy, depicting humanity’s dominating relationship with the natural world through a total sensory experience by German artists Böhler and Orendt.

Weaving your way through a series of looming tents, you’re greeted by animated apparitions on a mist screen—eerie but somehow endearing.

silhouetted drawings on the interior of a tent

Silhouetted drawings tell the story of seven animals who became extinct between 1750 and this decade. As you take in the sounds of the lost creatures, their visual story is told on the walls of the tents:  a Carolina Parakeet erased because of humans’ need for pretty feathers—the Steller’s sea cow wiped out for their bodacious natural resources. Through a haunting chant, you are forgiven for causing the victim’s imminent death, but one can’t help but feel guilty next to the towering tents topped with busts of the deceased.

In a masterful attempt to create what seems like the world’s most impactful haunted house, Böhler and Orendt have given us a spoonful of sugar to make the medicine go down.

artists Böhler and Orendt

The Carrion Cheer, A Faunistic Tragedy by Böhler and Orendt is on display until July 7 at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art

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Posted on July 2, 2018 by Matt Mill.

Categories: Uncategorized

Tags: A Faunistic Tragedy, Böhler, Charleston Art, Charleston Sc, Halsey, Halsey Institute Of Contemporary Art, Orendt, The Carrion Cheer

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